Graduate Student-Ambassador Workshops

students in a virtual conference

Student Ambassador Workshop Program

The Faculty of Social Sciences is proud to offer workshops in your high school classrooms! That’s right, booking a workshop means that our facilitators will travel to you! Our workshops highlight the many disciplines that make up the social sciences. By taking part in these interactive workshops grade 11 or grade 12 students will engage in enriching interactions and exchange ideas with outstanding graduate students. Our faculty’s graduate students are contributing solutions to current social problems by undertaking relevant research in their respective fields.

The workshops have been designed with the Ontario high school curriculum in mind. Please consult our complete topic offering below.

All our workshops are free and may be delivered in your class room (in person), via distance education (online), or on campus.

Interested in a topic that is not listed? Let us know. Our facilitators are able to tailor workshops to additional topics.

If you are an educator within the Quebec curriculum, please contact us. We will be able to ensure the workshops meet your needs!

Book a workshop!

Equity Studies

The following workshops will complement the content of grade 11 and 12 Equity Studies. Please consider the following workshops if you are teaching any of these courses:

  • Gender Studies (HSG 3M)
  • Equity, Diversity, and Social Justice (HSE 3E)
  • Equity and Social Justice: From Theory to Practice (HSE 4M)

What is unconscious bias? How to recognize it and develop tools to combat it when it negatively affects people’s lives.

Have you ever made a snap judgment about someone, only to find that your initial instinct was wrong? Those thoughts are called unconscious bias. Everyone encounters them, no one is immune to them. This session will explore what unconscious bias really is, what causes it, how it impacts others and how to identify and change negative biases within ourselves. Using constructive examples within the high school setting you will be invited to question society’s perceptions of marginalized groups and help deconstruct some of the bias against them. This workshop promotes introspection and lots of questions. Participants will learn and evolve through informative and engaging discussions.

Curriculum learning objectives

  • The Social Construction of Identity: demonstrate an understanding of how identity is socially constructed and internalized, and of the impact of social norms and stereotypes;
  • Power Relations: demonstrate an understanding of the dynamics of power relations in various social contexts.
  • Social Awareness and Individual Action: demonstrate an understanding of the impact individual action can have on equity, social justice, and environmental issues, and of how the media can create awareness of these issues.
  • Respecting Diversity: demonstrate an understanding of how to interact successfully in settings characterized by diversity, including school, workplace, and community settings, and ways to promote respect for diversity in these settings.
  • Media and Popular Culture: assess the impact of media and popular culture on equity and social
    justice issues.
  • Promoting Equity and Social Justice: demonstrate an understanding of how personal values, knowledge, and actions can contribute to equity and social justice, and assess strategies that people use to address equity and social justice concerns.
  • Opportunities for Participation: describe a variety of careers and volunteer.

Transferable skills

  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
  • Innovation, Creativity, and Entrepreneurship
  • Communication
  • Collaboration
  • Global Citizenship and Sustainability

 

Thinking about “crime” in criminology

Do you spend evenings sitting on your couch watching all there is on crime from movies, shows, to documentaries, but still have a lot of questions? You may be wondering how to define a crime or even a criminal? This workshop will provide some answers! Together, we will dive deep into the historical context of crime, push your thinking to new limits using numerous examples that illustrate its ambiguity, and perhaps even have you explore a new way of looking at this topic. With this is mind, sensitive subjects may be addressed to observe the constant evolution of the social context in which the notion of crime is found.

Curriculum learning objectives

  • Approaches and Perspectives: demonstrate an understanding of a range of perspectives on and approaches to equity and social justice issues, and of factors that affect inequity and social injustice.
    • explain how individual and systemic factors can cause or perpetuate inequity and social injustice.
    • analyse ways in which social and cultural belief systems can affect perspectives on and decisions relating to equity and social justice issues.
    • analyse how legislation, the courts, and public policy approach equity and social justice issues, and how they can affect people’s perceptions of these issues.
  • Power Relations: analyse, in historical and contemporary contexts, the dynamics of power relations and privilege as well as various factors that contribute to power or marginalization.
    • analyse the dynamics of power relations and privilege in various social settings, both historical and contemporary.
    • analyse the effects of bias, stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination, and oppression on individuals and groups.
  • Historical and Contemporary Issues: analyse a range of historical and contemporary equity and social justice issues and the impact of economic and environmental factors on these issues.
    • analyse the rationale for specific instances of social injustice in Canadian history, and demonstrate an understanding of how perspectives on the issues related to these historical injustices have changed.
    • analyse a broad range of current equity and social justice issues in Canada with reference to the underlying social circumstances and potential strategies for addressing the issues.

Transferable skills

  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
  • Innovation, Creativity, and Entrepreneurship
  • Communication
  • Collaboration
  • Global Citizenship and Sustainability
Family Studies

The following workshops will complement the content of grade 11 and 12 Family Studies. Please consider the following workshops if you are teaching any of these courses:

  • Dynamics of Human Relationships (HHD 3O)
  • Families in Canada (HHS 4U)
  • Families in Canada (HHS 4C)
  • Human Development throughout the Lifespan (HHG 4M)
  • Personal Life Management (HIP 4O)
  • Working with Infants and Young Children (HPW 3C)
  • Raising Healthy Children (HPC 3O)
  • Working with School-Age Children and Adolescents (HPD 4C)

Aging: Magnified and as Lived by an Ex-Prisoner

This compelling workshop walks us through the story of an elderly person who has spent many years in prison. Do you think their experience with aging will be much different from someone who spent their life in freedom? Examples and exercises during the session are used to illustrate social problems linked to aging and invite you to think critically about how society sees old age. We are all touched by the process of aging and certainly know about it from loved ones. However, this workshop will allow us to see aging through a new perspective, from a criminological point of view.

Curriculum learning objectives

  • Foundations for the Study of Social Change: demonstrate an understanding of the major theories, perspectives, and methodologies related to social change.
  • Causes and Effects of Social Change: demonstrate an understanding of the causes and effects of social change.
  • Demographics: demonstrate an understanding of the importance of demographics as a tool for studying social patterns and trends, both nationally and globally.
  • Forces That Shape Social Trends: demonstrate an understanding of how forces influence and shape social patterns and trends.
  • Global Inequalities: demonstrate an understanding of how various social structures and conditions support or limit global inequalities.
  • Risk and Resilience: demonstrate an understanding of threats to healthy development throughout the lifespan and of a variety of protective factors that can increase an individual’s resilience and reduce the impact of these threats.

Transferable skills

  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
  • Innovation, Creativity, and Entrepreneurship
  • Communication
  • Collaboration
  • Global Citizenship and Sustainability
General Social Sciences

The following workshops will complement the content of grade 11 and 12 General Social Sciences. Please consider the following workshops if you are teaching any of these courses:

  • Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology, and Sociology (HSP 3C)
  • Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology, and Sociology (HPS 3U)
  • Challenge and Change in Society (HSB 4U)

Identity within Social Media

Do you use social media? Do you have a virtual identity? Are you interested in knowing how your identity fits in with social media? If yes, then this workshop will be very interesting! Using some of the main concepts and theories in social sciences, we will explore just how they can be applied to a contemporary idea of identity. In doing so, this workshop will help develop a foundation of knowledge in anthropology, sociology and psychology. The goal of this workshop is to discuss and approach the topic of identity in social media critically through a multidisciplinary perspective.

Curriculum learning objectives

  • Describing the key definitions of anthropology, sociology and psychology.
  • Identifying and describing the concept of identity within social sciences.
  • Explaining Human Behaviour and Culture: using sociological, anthropological and psychological perspectives to explain how diverse factors influence and shape human behaviour and culture.
  • Socialization: use a sociological perspective to explain patterns of human socialization.
  • Discuss and identify the various psychological, sociological and anthropological theories related to identity.
  • Application of the theories and relevant subjects to social media and how that can relate to our social identity.

Transferable skills

  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
  • Innovation, Creativity, and Entrepreneurship
  • Communication
  • Collaboration

 

What is unconscious bias? How to recognize it and develop tools to combat it when it negatively affects people’s lives.

Have you ever made a snap judgment about someone, only to find that your initial instinct was wrong? Those thoughts are called unconscious bias. Everyone encounters them, no one is immune to them. This session will explore what unconscious bias really is, what causes it, how it impacts others and how to identify and change negative biases within ourselves. Using constructive examples within the high school setting you will be invited to question society’s perceptions of marginalized groups and help deconstruct some of the bias against them. This workshop promotes introspection and lots of questions. Participants will learn and evolve through informative and engaging discussions.

Curriculum learning objectives

  • The Social Construction of Identity: demonstrate an understanding of how identity is socially constructed and internalized, and of the impact of social norms and stereotypes.
  • Power Relations: demonstrate an understanding of the dynamics of power relations in various social contexts.
  • Social Awareness and Individual Action: demonstrate an understanding of the impact individual action can have on equity, social justice, and environmental issues, and of how the media can create awareness of these issues.
  • Respecting Diversity: demonstrate an understanding of how to interact successfully in settings characterized by diversity, including school, workplace, and community settings, and ways to promote respect for diversity in these settings.
  • Media and Popular Culture: assess the impact of media and popular culture on equity and social
    justice issues.
  • Promoting Equity and Social Justice: demonstrate an understanding of how personal values, knowledge, and actions can contribute to equity and social justice, and assess strategies that people use to address equity and social justice concerns.
  • Opportunities for Participation: describe a variety of careers and volunteer

Transferable skills

  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
  • Innovation, Creativity, and Entrepreneurship
  • Communication
  • Collaboration
  • Global Citizenship and Sustainability

 

Thinking about “crime” in criminology

Do you spend evenings sitting on your couch watching all there is on crime from movies, shows, to documentaries, but still have a lot of questions? You may be wondering how to define a crime or even a criminal? This workshop will provide some answers! Together, we will dive deep into the historical context of crime, push your thinking to new limits using numerous examples that illustrate its ambiguity, and perhaps even have you explore a new way of looking at this topic. With this is mind, sensitive subjects may be addressed to observe the constant evolution of the social context in which the notion of crime is found.

Curriculum learning objectives

  • Approaches and Perspectives: demonstrate an understanding of a range of perspectives on and approaches to equity and social justice issues, and of factors that affect inequity and social injustice.
    • explain how individual and systemic factors can cause or perpetuate inequity and social injustice.
    • analyse ways in which social and cultural belief systems can affect perspectives on and decisions relating to equity and social justice issues.
    • analyse how legislation, the courts, and public policy approach equity and social justice issues, and how they can affect people’s perceptions of these issues.
  • Power Relations: analyse, in historical and contemporary contexts, the dynamics of power relations and privilege as well as various factors that contribute to power or marginalization.
    • analyse the dynamics of power relations and privilege in various social settings, both historical and contemporary.
    • analyse the effects of bias, stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination, and oppression on individuals and groups.
  • Historical and Contemporary Issues: analyse a range of historical and contemporary equity and social justice issues and the impact of economic and environmental factors on these issues.
    • analyse the rationale for specific instances of social injustice in Canadian history and demonstrate an understanding of how perspectives on the issues related to these historical injustices have changed.
    • analyse a broad range of current equity and social justice issues in Canada with reference to the underlying social circumstances and potential strategies for addressing the issues.

Transferable skills

  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
  • Innovation, Creativity, and Entrepreneurship
  • Communication
  • Collaboration
  • Global Citizenship and Sustainability

 

Aging: Magnified and as Lived by an Ex-Prisoner

This compelling workshop walks us through the story of an elderly person who has spent many years in prison. Do you think their experience with aging will be much different from someone who spent their life in freedom? Examples and exercises during the session are used to illustrate social problems linked to aging and invite you to think critically about how society sees old age. We are all touched by the process of aging and certainly know about it from loved ones. However, this workshop will allow us to see aging through a new perspective, that is, a criminological point of view.

Curriculum learning objectives

  • Foundations for the Study of Social Change: demonstrate an understanding of the major theories, perspectives, and methodologies related to social change.
  • Causes and Effects of Social Change: demonstrate an understanding of the causes and effects of social change.
  • Demographics: demonstrate an understanding of the importance of demographics as a tool for studying social patterns and trends, both nationally and globally.
  • Forces That Shape Social Trends: demonstrate an understanding of how forces influence and shape social patterns and trends.
  • Global Inequalities: demonstrate an understanding of how various social structures and conditions support or limit global inequalities.
  • Risk and Resilience: demonstrate an understanding of threats to healthy development throughout the lifespan and of a variety of protective factors that can increase an individual’s resilience and reduce the impact of these threats.

Transferable skills

  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
  • Innovation, Creativity, and Entrepreneurship
  • Communication
  • Collaboration
  • Global Citizenship and Sustainability

Registration form

Interested? Fill out the registration form and we will reach out.

Questions? Contact DiscoverFSS@uOttawa.ca

Distance workshop

We offer distance workshop for schools outside of the capital region.

Fill out the registration form and add « distance » in the comment section.

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