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Masters in Globalization and International Development

Program

MA in Globalization and International Development

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The School of International Development and Global Studies (SIDGS) offers an interdisciplinary M.A. program in both English and French, which exposes students to a broad range of development theory, policy and practice, while also permitting specialization in one of four fields: Conflict, Transitions and Peace; Growth, Private Sector and Social Inclusion; Livelihoods, Resources and Sustainability; and Social Movements, Equity and Human Rights.  Students have opportunities for hands-on practice through Co-op and international internships, as well as for networking with development policymakers and NGOs in the federal capital.

Your M.A., Your way. You may complete the MA in Globalization and International Development by any of the following three tracks:

Thesis

Introduction to the Thesis Option

Basic Requirements

A student choosing the Thesis option with the M.A. in Globalization and International Development must complete a total of 18 units (6 courses), including 4 compulsory courses + 2 optional courses + thesis.

Why Choose the Thesis Option?

The Thesis option is recommended for students who wish to develop their ability to conduct and write-up original research.  Fieldwork in a developing country is often expected by academic supervisors. 

Expected Time-to-Completion

The requirements of the Thesis option can be completed in 5-6 semesters (20-24 months), bibliography and annexes not included.  Addition of the Co-op option will normally extend the program to 24-28 months.

Co-op Option

The student may participate in the Co-op program (two placements) within the framework of the M.A. by Thesis.  However, this will add time to the program, because he/she will normally have a Co-op placement in Year 1 (Summer) and Year 2 (Winter) and be required to return for at least one semester in order to submit his/her thesis.

Concentration in Development Practice

The Concentration in Development Practice can be combined with the MA by Thesis, but the student will be required to take two extra courses, on top of the 6 normally required.  Note that you will be required to take the majority of the “practice” courses during the Spring and Summer semesters. We do not advise that the Concentration in Development Practice be combined with the Thesis option.

Suggested Progress (MA by Thesis)

A detailed explanation of the suggested progress through the program can be found at: https://socialsciences.uottawa.ca/international-development-global-studies/programs/handbook-suggested-progress-masters

Thesis Requirements

The thesis is normally between 80-100 pages long (20,000 to 25,000 words).

The student must submit a thesis proposal which will be evaluated by the supervisor and second reader.  After submission of the final version of the thesis, the student is required to defend (orally) his/her thesis to a committee of 3 evaluators.

Major Research Paper

Introduction to the MRP Option

Basic Requirements

A student choosing the MRP option with the M.A. in Globalization and International Development must complete a total of 24 units (8 courses), including 4 compulsory courses + 4 optional courses + Major research paper (MRP).

Why Choose the MRP Option?

The MRP is recommended when the student is interested in deepening his/her knowledge of a certain issue, but does not require the advanced training in research skills, or academic exposition and argumentation learned through a thesis.  Generally, students in the MRP option do not conduct field work, and can usually complete program requirements more rapidly than thesis students.

Expected Time-to-Completion

The MRP option can be completed in 4-5 semesters (16-20 months).  The addition of the Co-op option will add 4 to 8 months to the program.

Co-op Option

You may participate in the Co-op program (two placements) within the framework of the M.A. by MRP.  However, this will add time to the program, because you will normally have a Co-op placement in Year 1 (Summer) and Year 2 (Winter) and be required to return for at least one semester in order to submit your MRP.

Concentration in Development Practice

The Concentration in Development Practice can be combined with the MA with MRP.  Note that you will be required to take the majority of the “practice” courses during the Spring and Summer semesters.

Suggested Progress (MA by MRP)

A detailed explanation of the suggested progress through the program can be found at: https://socialsciences.uottawa.ca/international-development-global-studies/programs/handbook-suggested-progress-masters

Format and Evaluation of the MRP

The MRP is to be a minimum of 12,000 and maximum of 15,000 words in length, excluding bibliography and annexes.  After submission, it is evaluated by the supervisor and a 2nd reader (blind to the student and to the supervisor), each of whom will attribute a mark to the student’s work. The final mark, which appears on the student’s transcript is the average of the two marks.

Coursework (Short Duration Master's)

Introduction to Coursework Option

Basic Requirements

A student choosing the Coursework option with the M.A. in Globalization and International Development must complete a total of 30 units (10 courses), including 4 mandatory courses.

Why Choose the Coursework Option?

The coursework option is recommended when the student does not want to conduct original research or fieldwork; is aiming for a rapid completion of program requirements; and wishes to pursue the Concentration in Development Practice.

Expected Time-to-Completion

The requirements of the coursework option, including the Concentration in Development Practice, can be completed in 12 months.  Addition of the Co-op option will extend the program to 16 or 20 months.

Co-op Option

Students may participate in the Co-op Option (1 or 2 placements) within the framework of the M.A. by coursework.  However, this will add significant time to the program.  If a student wants to register to the Co-op program, we recommend the MRP or Thesis options.

Concentration in Development Practice

The Concentration in Development Practice is designed for the M.A. by coursework option.  In addition to 4 courses required for the M.A. program, you will also be required to take 12 credits (4 courses) from a list of practice-designated courses, including one mandatory course - DVM 6105 International Development Programming: Results-Based Approaches.  Other practice courses include DVM 5171 Monitoring and Evaluation, DVM 5172 Gender-based Analysis, DVM 5173 Financing for Development Initiatives, DVM 5910 Internship, and DVM 6115 Special Topics in Professional Skills for International Development and Globalization.

Co-op for job experience. It is possible to combine any of these tracks (Thesis, MRP, Coursework) with paid Co-op placements that provide crucial job experience in the governmental and non-government organization (NGO) sectors.

Practical skills for international development. Students may take courses within the general requirements for the degree in order to obtain the following certification:

  • Concentration in Development Practice

In collaboration with the Institute of Feminist and Gender Studies, and the Institute of the Environment, we offer the following joint-programs:

  • Specialization in Women’s Studies
  • Specialization in Environmental Sustainability

International Internships possible with internationally based NGOs, and international organizations

A fast-track option from the Master’s (M.A.) to Doctoral (Ph.D.) program is available.

Scholarships and Teaching/ Research Assistantships are available to qualified applicants.

Deadline: April 1st Note: Based on availability in the program, strong applications will continue to be examined and admission scholarships are available for all eligible candidates.

Contact us

School of International Development and Global Studies

Faculty of Social Sciences
120 University Private
Social Sciences Building
Room 8005
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 6N5
Map

Personnel | Professors | Senior Fellows

Tel.: 613-562-5680

dvmma@uOttawa.ca

Office Hours
Monday to Friday 8:45 a.m. to 12 p.m. & 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
(June to August: closed at 3:30 p.m.)

Ginette Gautreau

Graduated 2014, MA in Globalization and Development (Co-op option)

Ginette Gautreau

After my Master’s at the University of Ottawa, I wasn’t sure where life would take me. I remained very passionate about our global community, being connected to both the international and the local, motivated by “doing good” and fired up by politics and uneven power structures.

At first, I wanted to stay in Ottawa for a while, build up my career, maybe work abroad. I worked first with the Humanitarian Coalition for nearly three years. Learning intensely through the partnership of HC member agencies about international humanitarian assistance and the challenges of complex, long-lasting humanitarian crises. I loved that work, but ultimately realized it wasn’t the right sector for me – I eventually wanted to go back home to the Maritimes and I didn’t see the career path and my personal path mesh. So, I left with a heavy heart in May 2015 - one of the last projects I worked on at the HC was in support of refugees and victims of the Syrian crises. This event will catch up to me a few months later.

After the HC, I decided to pursue a career more focused on women’s rights and landed a job with the Canadian Partnership for Maternal and Child Health (at the time called the Canadian Network for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health). I led the coordination of their annual meeting and connected with dozens of global health, women’s rights and international development organizations. Still, that pull to move back home was getting stronger, so I finally took the leap and packed up my apartment.

With my background in international cooperation and women’s rights, I joined the New Brunswick Multicultural Council first as Project Manager in November 2015. In a full circle, my first tasks were to support the anticipated resettlement of over 1,500 Syrian newcomers in New Brunswick. My work at the Humanitarian Coalition months prior were helpful in developing key messages to inform the public and member agencies on the realities of the crisis and provide important insight on the lives of refugees prior to their resettlement. My role at NBMC focused on empowering immigrant women. I led a project on supporting immigrant women experiencing domestic violence and instigated the creation of the New Brunswick Immigrant Women’s Association. Following a year of maternity leave, I returned to NBMC as Assistant Director – the role I hold today.

When not at work, I can be found at the pottery wheel, hiking with friends and discovering the beauty in my own back yard, planning my next trip, or, most likely, chasing after my toddler.

(updated October 2018)


Sarah D'Aoust

Graduated 2012, MA in Globalization and Development; 2009 Honours BA in Development and Globalization (Co-op option)

Sarah D'Aoust

When I decided to pursue my studies in International Development at the University of Ottawa I wasn’t sure where I would end up! I hoped that eventually I would land a job that was related to my field of study, where I could have a tangible, positive impact. After undergrad, the job prospects weren’t very promising, so I thought it would be a perfect time to do my MA. I was looking forward to learning more about development, and doing some original research of my own.

Nearing the end of my MA the job prospects really hadn’t improved as much as I had hoped. From my undergrad co-op experience, I knew that the best way to get a job with the government was through student work opportunities. I got my start with the former Canadian International Development Agency through an FSWEP (Federal Student Work Exchange Program) graduate student position. After I graduated, I continued working for the department and eventually secured a permanent position. I am now working as a Policy Analyst at the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development in the Global Issues and Development Branch. Since joining the department, I have been working on development and policy issues related to governance, and in particular natural resource governance. My education at the University of Ottawa provided a good foundation for working in development, and I apply the development concepts and principles that I learned during my studies to my work on a daily basis.

(updated December 2014)

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