Research at the Laboratory

Ongoing Reseach

Do you like me? Exploring the factors contributing to likeability 

The aim of this study is to better understand the relationships between emotions and likeability. Participants will first complete a set of questionnaires. Then, they will complete a video-recorded behavioural task, while wearing sensors to measure subtle changes in emotional signs. 

Help Us Help You! Understanding Stress and Anxiety in Undergraduate Students

The aim of the study is to better understand stress and anxiety in undergraduate students and to test different components of treatment. Participants will be asked to complete a variety of questionnaires, cognitive tasks, and a behavioural task. The first part of this study is an in-laboratory study that will take approximately sixty minutes to complete. The second part of this study involves the completion of a brief online questionnaire at a one-week follow-up that will take approximately ten minutes to complete. Although participants are required to sign up for time slots for part one and part two, the second part of the study is NOT in-person and can be done from anywhere using an electronic device in the two weeks following part one. Participants will be compensated with two course credits.

“I’m only going for one drink”: Investigating Thoughts, Emotions, and Drinking Behaviours

The purpose of this study is to better understand people’s thoughts, emotions, and drinking behaviours. Individuals willing to participate will be asked to complete a number of online questionnaires.    

How do you feel? Exploring reactions to emotional pictures

The aim of this study is to investigate how people regulate their feelings when asked to view emotional pictures. Participants will first complete a set of questionnaires, they will then view a series of emotional pictures, and complete a behavioural task. In addition, participants will be asked to wear sensors on their face and hand for a portion of the study.

You & Me: Examining Beliefs and Behaviours

The purpose of this study is to obtain information about how your views about yourself and others influences the way that you think, feel, and act. Individuals willing to participate will be asked to complete a number of online questionnaires.

Categorize This! Understanding How You Think, Feel, and Act

The aim of this study is to test new measures of cognition to better understand the relationships between different patterns of thinking, feeling, and acting. Participants will first complete a set of questionnaires. Then, participants will complete two computerized tasks related to categorization, while wearing facial sensors to measure subtle changes in involuntary electrical activity. Participants will also be asked to complete a behavioural task while being video recorded. 

Watch Where You Look! A New Way of Measuring Spider Fear 

The aim of this study is to test new ways of measuring cognition related to fear of spiders. Participants must have completed the online study entitled “Understanding Thoughts & Feelings 2” and be sent an invitation code in order to participate in this study. Participants will come in to the laboratory for 2 one-hour sessions, which will take place 7 days apart. Participants will be asked to book both sessions when they sign up. During those two sessions, participants will complete questionnaires, as well as computerized and in-person cognitive and behavioural tasks. 

Completed Research

Do you have what it takes? Validating new measures of academic achievement

The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between academic achievement and different ways of thinking, feeling, and behaving. Participants were asked to complete a variety of questionnaires, computerized tasks, and a behavioural task. Participants were then asked to wear a respiration belt and two sensors on their non-dominant hand for a portion of the laboratory visit. This was an in-laboratory study that took approximately ninety minutes to complete. Participants were compensated with two course credits. 

Dealing with feelings

The aim of this study was to investigate emotion regulation to better understand the relationships between thinking and feeling. Participants first completed a set of questionnaires; then, they viewed a number of pictures while wearing sensors on the face and hand, which measured subtle changes in involuntary psychophysiological activity. 

Sexual experiences, thoughts, & feelings

The purpose of this study, in collaboration with Dr. Krystelle Shaughnessy’s INSITE Lab, is to better understand the relationships between different patterns of thinking and feeling and how these influence sexual experiences. For this study, participants will complete a set of questionnaires online.


The effects of fears of negative and positive evaluation on excessive reassurance seeking

In two related but distinct studies, we investigated the interactive effects of fear of negative evaluation (FNE) and fear of positive evaluation (FPE) on excessive reassurance seeking (ERS). In Study 1, participants completed a series of questionnaires with the purpose of better understanding how some people seek reassurance more than others. We found that FNE is important across both general and evaluative reassurance seeking, whereas FPE may be particularly important in determining how much they seek general threat-related reassurance from others only. FNE and FPE interacted to predict ERS, but only when the reassurance was sought from close others. In Study 2, participants completed the same questionnaires, with the exception of one, which was modified to provide a social-evaluative context to the reassurance seeking. We found that only FNE contributed to greater ERS, which may consequently maintain social anxiety. FPE’s mixed effects on ERS in Study 1 and 2 suggest that its role is uncertain and that it may not contribute to greater ERS. More studies are needed to further clarify the effects of fears of evaluation on reassurance seeking behaviour. A manuscript describing these studies is currently under review for publication.

Poster we presented at the 2016 Centre for Clinical Research in Health Conference in Montreal, QC. 

Poster we presented at the 2016 Canadian Association for Cognitive and Behavioural Therapies Conference in Hamilton, ON.

Anxiety sensitivity as an indicator of poor emotion regulation in anxiety

For this study, we investigated how beliefs about emotions (BE), difficulties in emotion regulation (ER), and anxiety sensitivity (AS; fear of anxiety-related symptoms), are related to mood and anxiety symptoms. Participants completed a series of questionnaires with the purpose of better understanding how some people are more vulnerable to experiencing anxiety than others. We found that the relationship between AS and anxiety symptoms was partially accounted for by difficulties in emotion regulation. The relationship between AS and depressive symptoms was fully accounted for by difficulties in emotion regulation. We also found that certain types of beliefs about emotions were more important than others in predicting anxiety symptoms.

Read the article online in the Journal of Cogent Psychology.

Poster we presented at the 2015 Canadian Psychological Association Conference in Ottawa, ON.

Patterns of change in group CBT for OCD

This study was conducted during Dr. Ouimet’s residency at the Anxiety Treatment and Research Centre (ATRC) at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton. We investigated whether people changed at different rates during group CBT for OCD. We found that people did change at different rates (or according to different patterns), and that both OCD and depressive severity impacted who got better when.

Read the article online in the Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders.

Thinking high but feeling low: An exploratory cluster analysis investigating how ‘implicit’ and ‘explicit’ spider fear co-vary

This study was conducted when Dr. Ouimet was a doctoral student in Dr. Radomsky’s Anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Disorders Laboratory at Concordia University. In this study we were interested in how direct ‘implicit’ and ‘explicit’ spider fear co-vary in the general population, and whether any observed co-variance predicts key constructs related to spider fear. Participants completed computerized tasks and self-report questionnaires, and answered some questions about their willingness to approach a spider. We found three unique groups: 1) low explicit/low implicit (41.1%), 2) average explicit/high implicit (39.1%) and 3) high explicit/low implicit (19.5%). Cluster 3 (high explicit fear) demonstrated the highest levels of disgust, and lowest ratings of willingness to approach the spider. Overall, our study supported differential predictive validity of explicit and implicit measures – when explicit fear is high, it may be more important than implicit fear in dictating behaviour.

Poster presented at the Anxiety Special Interest Group meeting during the 2013 American Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies Convention in Toronto, ON.

Read the article online in Cognition and Emotion.

 

 

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