Our Professors in the Media

03/24/2014 - Pain caused by sanctions on Russia for 'greater national interest,' Stephen Harper tells Canadian businesses

Prime Minister Harper warned Canadian businesses with Russian dealings to brace for economic pain for “the greater national interest,” as he and other G7 leaders issued a sharp rebuke of President Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Crimea. Patrick Leblond, divulges that Harper's policy stance is economically relevant and this is why, "the Europeans are much more careful in their response to Putin. They stand to lose a lot more than we do.”

03/21/2014 - PM Harper, Baird leaves Ottawa this morning for Ukraine

Stephen Harper is headed to Ukraine to become the first leader of a G7 nation to visit the eastern European country since pro-Western demonstrators drove out its government last month. Roland Paris, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, proclaims why other countries have been more resistant to make a move.

03/21/2014 - Foreign policy bosom buddies: John Baird says the PM's similar worldview makes his job easier

When John Baird was named foreign minister in 2011, many doubted that a man who made his reputation in politics as a pit bull could handle the delicate job of international diplomacy. However, now, three years later, Roland Paris, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, says Baird has been an energetic foreign minister who has elevated the issue of gay rights around the world. 

03/21/2014 - Forum: The feds have been closing the libraries of its departments and commissions as a way to cut the budget deficit, but a deficit of knowledge may be worse

In an effort to reduce the ­federal deficit, the government has quietly been closing down a number of federal science libraries dealing with fisheries, forests and health but people are concerned that savings to the Canadian taxpayer does not justify a deficit of knowledge. Michael Molloy, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, elaborates.

03/18/2014 - Canadian aid priorities in Aftghanistan harmed development aid, government legitimacy

After conducting extensive research, Nipa Banerjee, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, contends that Canada’s decision to prioritize its profile in Afghanistan when providing development aid took money away from the most successful aid projects and undermined the legitimacy of the Afghan government.

03/18/2014 - Un « message fort » pour Poutine?

AUDIO: Experts discuss the implications of the political situation and Russian military intervention in Ukraine at this event presented by uOttawa's Centre for International Policy Studies.  Panellists include Dominique Arel, Chair of Ukrainian Studies, Paul Robinson, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, and Errol Mendes, Common Law Section (0:25- 82:45).

03/15/2014 - The LINK Online (Sat Mar 15, 2014)

AUDIO: With over 2.5 million Syrians still seeking refuge and Canada having only admitted ten so far, Patti Lenard, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, characterizes Canada’s response to the Syrian refugee crisis as, "unconscionable". (21:10- 26:48)

03/15/2014 - The LINK Online (Sat Mar 15, 2014)

AUDIO: With over 2.5 million Syrians still seeking refuge and Canada having only admitted ten so far, Patti Lenard, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, characterizes Canada’s response to the Syrian refugee crisis as, "unconscionable". (21:10- 26:48)

03/13/2014 - Ottawa imposes life-long gag order on bureaucrats, lawyers

With regards to the new regulations governing secrecy that have been enforced upon bureaucrats and lawyers working in a number of government agencies dealing with sensitive national security information, Wesley Wark, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, is satisfied with the "terrific chill" the regulations have sparked on the possibility of drawing on practitioner expertise.

03/13/2014 - Ottawa imposes life-long gag order on bureaucrats, lawyers

With regards to the new regulations governing secrecy that have been enforced upon bureaucrats and lawyers working in a number of government agencies dealing with sensitive national security information, Wesley Wark, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, is very concerned about the ‘terrific chill’ the regulations have imposed on the possibility of drawing on practitioner expertise

03/12/2014 - Too early to declare Canada's legacy in Afghanistan

As Canada's 12 years long military mission officially wraps up in Afghanistan, Roland Paris, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, cautions people that it may be too early to celebrate its success. Unfortunately, he says, the mission which focused much of their work on development shows no guarantee that Canada is leaving the country in an improved enough state that the projects will be sustained.

03/12/2014 - Too early to declare Canada's legacy in Afghanistan

As Canada's 12 years long military mission officially wraps up in Afghanistan, Roland Paris, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, cautions people that it may be too early to celebrate its success. Unfortunately, he says, the mission which focused much of their work on development shows no guarantee that Canada is leaving the country in an improved enough state that the projects will be sustained.

03/12/2014 - Stephen Harper and Pauline Marois seek permanent advantage

Patti Lenard, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, discloses in this Op-Ed how Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Quebec Premier Pauline Marois are using legislation to keep opposition voters away on election day.

03/12/2014 - Accord de libre-échange entre le Canada et la Corée du Sud

AUDIO: Patrick Leblond, École supérieure d'affaires publiques et internationales, traite sur la signature d'un accord de libre-échange entre le Canada et la Corée du Sud qui produit les réactions plutôt positives avec l'opportunité d'établir un marché très lucratif pour les cultivateurs canadiens (1:48:12- 1:55:10).

03/11/2014 - Don't undermine Elections Canada

A group of professors who study the principles and institutions of constitutional democracy have composed a petition in opposition to the Fair Elections Act (Bill C-23). Amongst those who signed is Patti Tamara Lenard, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. The group of experts believe that the proposed changes to our election laws are a threat to Canada’s democratic traditions.

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